how to get water out of your phone speaker

 

speaker

Introduction

If you've ever dropped your phone in water, you know that it can be incredibly frustrating. Even if your device is still functional, there's often a lingering sense of anxiety knowing that the liquid may have caused lasting damage and could stop working at any time. And while some phones aren't designed to withstand being submerged in water at all (for example, those with SIM cards on the outside), others can survive short-term exposure without issue provided they're dried out quickly enough after being submerged.

The first step is to shut down your phone. Don't attempt to power it on until the inside is completely dry.

The first step is to shut down your phone. Don't attempt to power it on until the inside is completely dry.

If you have any other devices that rely on speakers, such as laptops or tablets, they also need to be shut down with the same precautionary measures as phones.

Remove any cases or other attachments from your phone.

Remove any cases or other attachments from your phone.

Use a towel to dry off around the edges of where the battery sits so no liquid gets into that area. Shake out as much water as possible. Place your phone in a bowl of uncooked rice or silica gel packets, which can help remove moisture from your device's internal components. This can take several hours, depending on how wet it was and how much moisture is left inside after you've removed as much as you can by hand, but it's worth doing if you want to save your beloved device: Rice will absorb any extra water still clinging to its insides while silica packs are designed specifically for this purpose; they'll suck up any excess moisture without damaging its interior electronics

Next, you need to remove the SIM card. Take care not to bend or damage this component, as it's delicate and expensive.

Next, you need to remove the SIM card. Take care not to bend or damage this component, as it's delicate and expensive.

  • Do not use a paperclip or any other object to extract your SIM card. Doing so may cause damage to your device and/or components.

  • Do not touch the gold contacts on either side of the SIM card with anything sharp or abrasive you could seriously damage them! Also avoid touching them with any part of your mouth; that stuff’s gross! You got it? Good.

  • Once you have removed both batteries from their compartments (see previous step), carefully flip over one of them so that its top side faces up toward yours this will make it easier for you to remove its cover plate later on in this process. Be sure not to lose track of which battery is which: if they’re installed incorrectly later on down the line when putting everything back together again after cleaning out all those nasty water particles inside there will be serious consequences such as overheating due at least partly due but mostly completely unrelated reasons like maybe because maybe some people might think maybe just maybe - but whatever!

Remove the battery if you can. Some phones have removable batteries while others don't. If there's no way of removing your phone's battery, move onto the next step.

If you have a phone with a removable battery, remove it. If your phone doesn't have one, skip ahead to step two. Removing the battery will let you dry out the inside of your phone more quickly.

Shake out as much water as possible. Use a towel to dry off around the edges of where the battery sits so no liquid gets into that area.

Shake out as much water as possible. Use a towel to dry off around the edges of where the battery sits so no liquid gets into that area. Don't use a hair dryer or other heat source to dry your phone, and don't use any other liquid to clean your phone.

Place your phone in a bowl of uncooked rice or silica gel packets for at least 24 hours, but ideally up to 48 hours. This will help draw moisture out of the phone and prevent corrosion in any other components such as the headphone jack or charging port.

Place your phone in a bowl of uncooked rice or silica gel packets for at least 24 hours, but ideally up to 48 hours. This will help draw moisture out of the phone and prevent corrosion in any other components such as the headphone jack or charging port.

Rice is a good option because it absorbs moisture, though silica gel packets are more effective at drawing moisture out of the phone (and they last longer than rice). Be sure to put your phone in a bowl or container so it doesn't get damaged by any falling rice or silica gel packets.

After removing your phone from the rice, let it sit for about three days to ensure it dries completely before attempting to run a test on it by powering it on.

After removing your phone from the rice, let it sit for about three days to ensure it dries completely before attempting to run a test on it by powering it on. Don't try to use the phone while it is still wet or try to power on until it is completely dry and you have tested that there are no problems with its functionality.

Some easy steps can save your phone from potentially catastrophic water damage

  • Shut down your phone. Immediately remove the battery if you can, otherwise turn it off. If your phone is still on, the water will continue to run through its system and cause more damage.

  • Remove any cases or other attachments from your phone. If there are any small pieces of debris that got into your device, they could short out a circuit board when they dry out and become electrified again which would be very bad news for you!

  • Shake out as much water as possible before turning it back on or placing it in rice (or silica gel packets).

Conclusion

The takeaway here is that, if you accidentally drop your phone in water, there are steps you can take to save it. If it's still working after the initial shock of submersion, then drying it out and letting it sit for a few days shouldn't harm its performance too much.

 

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Samir Guevara
Samir Guevara
Samir Guevara is a WirelessSpeakersReviewer.com reviewer and has over 10 years of experience in the audio industry. He has been reviewing portable audio systems and amps for the past 5 years, and his reviews have been featured on sites like Amazon, B&H Photo, and GearJunkie. Samir is currently a senior review editor at WirelessSpeakersReview.com and is responsible for all aspects of product reviews including content, grammar, spelling, style, and organization. In his spare time he enjoys playing video games (particularly Crossy Road) watching TV shows (particularly popular series like “Breaking Bad”), playing music in his room or backyard with friends or family, or writing short stories.